Heritage and Awareness Challenges

Collage of artwork from challenges

"We begin to learn wisely when we're willing to see the world from other people's perspectives." - Toba Beta

CSM's 5-Day Heritage and Awareness Challenges observe national heritage and awareness months by engaging the lived experiences and perspectives of the many communities that shape us all.

Each challenge can be completed in five consecutive days or over the course of a month. As you participate, challenge yourself to look deeply at your responses -- your beliefs and feelings. Keep a journal of your thoughts and revelations. What are you learning? How are you affected? 

CSM faculty and staff who register for challenges can earn formal recognition of professional learning. Permanent faculty can use professional development points for this year’s Faculty Development Plan. Eight hours of participation equals one point. Staff and adjunct faculty can earn certificates of participation for their employee files. 

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Pride Month is celebrated each June to honor the June 28,1969, Stonewall Uprising in Greenwich Village, Manhattan, NY. Stonewall was a tipping point for the Gay Liberation Movement in the United States. On and around June 28, 1970, gay activists held the first gay pride parades in major cities around the US. Soon the "day" expanded to encompass month-long series of parades, picnics, parties, workshops, symposia and concerts. Today, LGBTQ+ Pride Month honors the local, national, and international contributions and impact of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and other individuals.

Celebrate by joining CSM's 5-Day LGBTQ+ Pride Awareness Challenge! Engage the lived experiences, perspectives, and concerns of LGBTQ+ community members. Complete as many activities as you have time for. Follow your curiosity! 

Register for the LGBTQ+ Pride Awareness Challenge.

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  • Attend: Virtual Screening of the PBS's The American Experience: The Stonewall Uprising
    Thursday, June 17, 2:30-4:00 pm | Zoom

    In the early morning hours of June 28, 1969 police raided the Stonewall Inn, a popular gay bar in the Greenwich Village section of New York City. That night the street erupted into violent protests and street demonstrations that lasted for the next three days. The Stonewall riots marked a major turning point in the modern gay civil rights movement in the United States and around the world. 

    Register here.   View the Trailer.  

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Virtual Check-In:
 Tuesday, June 30, 3:00-4:00 pm   

An informal meeting to talk with others about the Challenge: share new insights and new ideas! 
Advance registration is required. Register here by June 30, 12:00 pm. 

In 1976, after the US Bicentennial celebrations, Congressional staffer Jeanie Jew urged Representative Frank Horton (R-NY) to designate a month to recognize Asian Pacific Americans. In 1977, Rep. Horton and Rep. Norman Y. Mineta (D-CA) introduced a House resolution to establish May 1-10 as Asian-Pacific Heritage Week. They chose May to commemorate the dates that the first Japanese immigrant arrived in the US (May 7, 1843) and that the golden spike was driven into the Transcontinental Railroad, built largely by Chinese immigrants (May 10, 1869). President Jimmy Carter signed a joint resolution establishing Asian Pacific Heritage Week in 1978. May became Asian Pacific American Heritage Month in 1992.

Celebrate by joining CSM's 5-Day Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Challenge! Engage the lived experiences, perspectives, and concerns of community members of Asian American and Pacific Islander heritage. This year we feature the Global Initiative Committee's International Week celebration of Korea: Korea Fest! Complete as many activities as you have time for. Follow your curiosity!

Register for the Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Challenge.  


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Virtual Check-In: Tuesday, June 8, 2:00-3:00 pm   
An informal meeting to talk with others about the Challenge: share new insights and new ideas! 
Advance registration is required. Register here by June 8, 12:00 noon. 

On April 20, 2006, President George W. Bush proclaimed that May would be Jewish American Heritage Month. The declaration was the culmination of years of effort by the Jewish Museum of Florida and Jewish community leaders in South Florida to celebrate more than 350 years of Jewish contributions to American life and culture. In fact, May was chosen to commemorate the May 2004 celebration of the 350th Anniversary of American Jewish History organized by the American Jewish Historical Society, the Library of Congress, the National Archives and other organizations.

Register for the Jewish-American Heritage Challenge.
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  • Attend: Virtual Screening of the PBS documentary, The Jewish Journey: America
    Tuesday, May 18, 2:30-4:00 pm | Zoom     
    Trace Jewish immigration to the U.S. through the centuries with history and personal stories. 
    Register here.   View the Trailer.
Sponsored by the Equity and Inclusive Diversity Office

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Virtual Check-In:
 Wednesday, June 9, 10:00-11:00 am   

An informal meeting to talk with others about the Challenge: share new insights and new ideas! 
Advance registration is required. Register here by June 9, 9:00 am. 

Irish-American Heritage Month was first established in 1991 by proclamation of the President and Congress to honor the achievements and contributions of Irish immigrants and their descendants living in the United States. It is celebrated in March to coincide with St. Patrick's Day, the March 17th Irish national holiday and Roman Catholic religious holiday honoring the saint who introduced Christianity to Ireland in the early fifth century.

Celebrate National Irish-American Heritage Month by joining CSM's 5-Day Irish-American Heritage Challenge! Engage the lived experiences, perspectives, and concerns of community members of Irish-American heritage. Complete as many activities as you have time for. Follow your curiosity!

Register for the Irish-American Heritage Challenge.

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Virtual Check-In: Friday, April 2, 2:30-3:30 pm   
An informal meeting to talk with others about the Challenge: share new insights and new ideas! 
Advance registration is required. Register here by April 2, 12:00 noon. 

In 1981 Congress passed Pub. L. 97-28, requesting and authorizing President Ronald Reagan to designate the week beginning March 7, 1982, as “Women’s History Week.” Congress continued to pass joint resolutions annually for “Women’s History Week” until, in 1987, the National Women’s History Project petitioned Congress to designate the full month of March as “Women’s History Month.” Each year, we now celebrate women's many and varied achievements and contributions to US history and culture.

Join the celebration of National Women's History Month by taking CSM's 5-Day Women's History Challenge! Explore and engage the lived experiences, perspectives, and concerns of American women. Complete as many activities as you have time for. Follow your curiosity!

Register for the Women's History Challenge. 

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  • Visit: The Equal Rights Amendment website.
  • Read: "Arguments For and Against the Equal Rights Amendment," by Sydney Hamilton, Brief Policy Perspectives
  • Attend: Virtual Screening of Equal Rights Amendment: Unfinished Business for the Constitution
    Thursday, March 11, 3:00-4:00 pm | Zoom      
    As supporters of the Equal Rights Amendment lobbied, marched, rallied, petitioned, picketed, went on hunger strikes, and committed acts of civil disobedience between 1972 and 1982, it is probable that many of them were not aware of their place in the long historical continuum of women's struggle for constitutional equality in the United States. This brief documentary (17 mins.) tells their story.  Register here.   View the trailer. 

Day 3: Theme: Intersectional Feminism

Day 4:  Theme: Intersectional Feminism

Day 5:  Theme: Notable Maryland Women

Virtual Check-In: Thursday, April 1, 2:30-3:30 pm   
An informal meeting to talk with others about the Challenge: share new insights and new ideas! Advance registration is required. Register here by April 1, 12:00 noon. 

In 1926, historian Carter G. Woodson and the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History stablished the second week of February as Negro History Week to promote the teaching of the history of Black Americans in U.S. public schools. In 1970, after a year of campaigning for a National Black History Month, black students and educators at Kent State University took the lead in observing it. By 1976, institutions across the country joined Kent State in celebrating, and President Gerald Ford recognized National Black History Month officially as part of the nation's bicentennial celebration. 

Join the celebration of National Black History Month by taking CSM's 5-Day Black History Challenge! This year, we devote special attention to notable African-Americans from Maryland and Southern Maryland. Explore and engage the lived experiences, perspectives, and concerns of our African-American community members. Complete as many activities as you have time for. Follow your curiosity!

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  • Play! FACTUALITY Game  Tuesday, February 16, 3:00-4:30 pm | Zoom
    • FACTUALITY is a virtual facilitated dialogue, crash course, and game that allows participants to have a courageous conversation about structural inequality. Participants assume the identities of characters encountering fact-based advantages and limitations based on the intersections of race, class, gender, faith, and sexual orientation. Open to CSM students faculty, and staff. Sponsored by Student Life in partnership with the Equity and Inclusive Diversity Office.
  • Watch: Holy Post: Race in America | Phil Vischer
  • Visit: The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in Southern Maryland

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  • Attend: Virtual Screening of Redeeming Uncle Tom: The Josiah Henson Story
    Tuesday, February 23, 3:00-4:30 pm | Zoom     
    This ground-breaking documentary restores a hero of the abolitionist movement to his rightful place in history. Josiah Henson, a dynamic man born in Charles County, overcame incredible odds to escape from slavery with his wife and children. His life inspired the lead character of ‘Uncle Tom’ in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s 1852 classic novel which has been recognized as one of the sparks that ignited the Civil War. Critically acclaimed actor Danny Glover narrates the voice of Josiah Henson. Register here.
     View the Official Trailer.
    Sponsored by the Equity and Inclusive Diversity Office in partnership with Student Life. 

Virtual Check-In: Thursday, March 4, 2:30-3:30 pm  

An informal meeting to talk with others about the Challenge: share new insights and new ideas!

As our nation approaches Inauguration Day, January 20th,, we are navigating political polarization and waves of media disinformation, racism, and --oh, yes-- a global pandemic.  

At CSM, we are one community navigating all of this together. In the spirit of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., whose birthday we celebrate on January 18th, let’s aim for peace and mutual understanding. Let us begin by seeking and finding our common ground. 

Please join Dr. Murphy in taking the 5-Day Finding Common Ground Challenge. Devote some time, on any five days between January 18 and 31, to reading articles, watching videos, and doing activities that increase your understanding of conservatism and liberalism, of Republicans and Democrats. What do we stand for? What are we challenged by?  

What concerns and interests might we have in common that we simply haven’t noticed? 

Complete the challenge in five consecutive days or over the course of two weeks—your choice. On each day, complete as many activities as you have time for. No pressure. Follow your curiosity. Keep a journal of your thoughts and revelations. Then join our virtual discussion on Thursday, February 4, 2:30-3:30 pm. 

Faculty and staff who participate can earn formal recognition of professional learning. Permanent faculty can use professional development points for this year’s Faculty Development Plan. Eight hours of participation equals one point. Staff and adjunct faculty can earn certificates of participation for their employee files.  

Questions? Contact Dr. Sybol Anderson: ssanderson1@csmd.edu

Day 1:  Prologue: "You Are No Longer My Mother" by Tim Reid, Gabriella Borter, and Michael
     Martin
     Introduction: Conservatism, Modern Liberalism, and Their Common Ground -- Classical
     Liberalism

Day 2: It's Complicated ...

Day 3: Republican Platforms

Day 4: Democratic Platforms

Day 5: Finding Common Ground

Virtual Check-In: Thursday, February 4, 2:30-3:30 pm  

An informal meeting to talk with others about the Challenge: What did you learn about liberalism and conservatism that was unknown to you before the Challenge? How do you feel about what you learned?

Did you know that 34% of Southern Maryland households seriously struggle to make ends meet ... and that was before COVID hit? Did you know that three-quarters of those households are working families earning above the federal poverty level? They are ALICE families: Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed.

In January, as we celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday, we call attention to the quest for economic justice, Dr. King's final campaign. Join CSM's 5-Day ALICE/Poverty Awareness Challenge, and learn more about economic and social challenges faced by some of our most hard-working, talented, and resilient neighbors.

Register for the ALICE/Poverty Awareness Challenge

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  • Read: "CSM Hosts 7th Mobile Hawk Feeder Event" | CSM Newsroom
  • Act: Donate to CSM's Help a Hawk Fund (choose "Hawk Feeder" on the drop down menu), or invite your church or organization to donate food and supplies!
  • One of the very best ways to help "fuel the fire" of our hard-working students is through
     the Help a Hawk Fund (which includes the Mobile Hawk Feeder Program: "Take What You
     Need -
     Give What You Can"). Some ways Help a Hawk funds are used: 
    • Hawk Feeder care packages
    • Tuition assistance 
    • Technology and educational supplies
  • The CSM Foundation established the Help a Hawk Fund to ensure the COVID-19 crisis
    doesn't impede or derail our students from reaching their goals. No student should have to choose between affording to live and affording to learn.
  • Checks for these funds/projects can be sent to: CSM Foundation, PO Box 910, La Plata, MD 20646. Make checks payable to "CSM Foundation".
  • Want to stock Hawk Feeders? Due to COVID, Student Life may only accept food donations from organizations or churches (not individuals). If your organization or church would like to donate food to the Hawk Feeder Program, please contact Ms. Erika Abell.

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Virtual Check-In: Thursday, January 28, 2:30-3:30 pm

An informal meeting to talk with others about the Challenge: What did you learn about
ALICE and poverty that was unknown to you before the Challenge? How do you feel about
what you learned? Advance registration required. Register here by January 28 at 12:00 noon.


 

 

December brings a wonderful season of celebrations! This year Hanukkah, a Jewish holiday, is observed December 10-18. On December 21 many celebrate the Winter Solstice. Christmas, a Christian holiday, is celebrated on December 25. And December 26-January 1 marks the annual Kwanzaa celebration, an African-American tradition. 

Join CSM's 5-Day Holiday Season Challenge, and let's celebrate together by learning together!


Day 1:    
Read: "Hanukkah" and "Winter Solstice" on History.com

Day 2:    Read: "History of Christmas" and "Kwanzaa" on History.com

Day 3:    Explore: Chabad.org's website, "Celebrate Chanukah"

Day 4:    Explore: WhyChristmas.com's website, "Christmas Traditions & Customs"

Day 5:
    Explore: "Kwanzaa: A Celebration of Family, Community, and Culture,"
               the official Kwanzaa website    


Virtual Check-In: Thursday, January 7, 2:30-3:30 pm   
An informal meeting to talk with others about the Challenge: What did you learn about celebrations unknown to you before the Challenge ... and what more did you learn about those familiar to you? How do you feel about what you learned? Advance registration required. 

 

Join CSM's Global Initiatives Committee (GIC) in celebrating International Week by joining the 5-Day International Week Challenge: Korea! The GIC joins Maryland Humanities in celebrating its 2020 One Maryland, One Book selection: Lisa See's The Island of Sea Women. The book chronicles the lives of two girls, Young-sook and Mi-ja, who live on the Korean island, Jeju. Though having differences in family lineage, the two friends seem inseparable. Their friendship is tested to the breaking point during the Japanese occupation of the 1930’s and 1940’s, World War II, and through the Korean War. 

Explore with us the lived experiences, perspectives, concerns, and culture of Koreans and Korean Americans.

Nov 16:  Visit: Maryland Humanities' One Book, One Maryland website. Learn about The Island of Sea Women and author Lisa See. Be sure to watch the video by First Lady Yumi Hogan!
                Watch: One Maryland, One Book Author Tour (Lisa See): Calvert   
                Visit: The Korean Cultural Center, Washington DC website. Be sure to explore the tab:
                 
Korea Information!

Nov 17:  Attend: CSM's International Week Keynote Presentation: "Cell Phones in Two Koreas: A
               Window to Balanced Intellectual Curiosity? Mr. Yonho Kim, Associate Director, GW Institute
               for Korean Studies. 2:00 pm on Zoom. Advance registration required. Register here.
               Watch: Mojo's Top 10 Iconic K-Pop Songs  
               Reflect: What have you learned so far about Korean life and culture that you did not know
                before? What else would you like to know about Korea?

Nov 18:  Read: "It's Not Just 'Parasite': Korean Cinema has a Deep, Rich History," by Haeryung Kang
               Dinner and a Movie: Order take-out from Bonchon Chicken and join K-Cinema at Home:
               The Tiger hosted by the Korean Cultural Center, Washington, DC (free and available Nov.
               16-22). Advance registration required. Register here.
 

Nov 19:  Attend: GIC Virtual Tour: The Old Korean Legation Museum in Washington, DC.  
               Attend: "Writing Empathy: A Conversation with Cho Haejin and Translator Ji-Eun Lee." 
               8:00-9:00 pm EST. Register here.
               Attend: The GIC's Discussion of "Writing Empathy," 9:00 pm on Zoom. Register here.
 
               Visit: The Missing Slate's website: Modern and Contemporary Korean Women Poets

Nov 20:
 Watch: Korean Series Baseball! Bears-Wiz winner vs. NC Dinos. 4:30 am EST on ESPN2.
              Watch: NBC LeftField's "What Is Mukbang?"

Dec 11:  Attend: The GIC's Rescheduled Virtual Korean Cooking Class sponsored by No Thyme to Cook, located in Solomons, Maryland. 6:00-8:00 pm on Zoom. Tickets: $25. Register here.

Virtual Check-In: Monday, November 30, 1:00-2:00 pm   
An informal meeting to talk with others about International Week and the Challenge: What more did you learn about Korean life, society, and culture? How do you feel about what you learned?

 

Native Americans have observed American Indian Day to honor the contributions of First Americans since 1915. In 1990, President George H. W. Bush approved a resolution to designate November 1990 “National American Indian Heritage Month.” Proclamations have been issued every year since 1994.

Celebrate National Native American Heritage Month by joining CSM's 5-Day Native-American Heritage Challenge! Explore and engage the lived experiences, perspectives, and concerns of our Native-American community members.

Day 1:  Watch: The Canary Effect
             Reflect: What did you learn about the experience of Native Americans that you did not know before? How do you feel about what you have learned?

Day 2:  Visit: The National Native-American Heritage Month website.
             Read: U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo
             Watch: Interview with Poet Laureate Joy Harjoy
  

Day 3:  Read: "Piscataway-Conjoy: Rejuvenating Ancestral Ties to Southern Parks" by the MD 
             Department of Natural Resources

             Visit: The UMD Libraries' website: Native Americans in Maryland: A Resource Guide
             Visit: The Maryland Commission on Indian Affairs website
             Reflect: What did you learn today about Native-Americans in Maryland? How will you use that knowledge?

Day 4:  Watch: "The Standing Rock Resistance and Our Fight for Indigenous Rights" - TED Talk by Tara Houska
             Watch: "America's Native Prisoners of War" - TED Talk by Aaron Huey
             Reflect: "How can you change the conversation for extremely oppressed and forgotten
             people?"

Day 5: Visit: History.com's Native American History website
             Visit: The Poetry Foundation's Native-American Poetry and Culture website. Be sure to check out the articles and podcasts at the bottom of the page!
             Reflect: What new things did you learn today about Native-American history, literature, and culture? How will you use your new knowledge?

Virtual Check-In: Friday, November 20, 2:30-3:30 pm   
           An informal meeting to talk with others about the Challenge: share new insights and new ideas!

In 1988 the US Congress declared October National Disability Employment Awareness Month to raise awareness of the employment needs and contributions of individuals who happen to disabilities of many kinds. Currently about 61 million Americans (~26%) have disabilities. This month, we honor and recognize their many accomplishments and contributions.  

Celebrate National Disability Awareness Month by joining CSM's 5-Day Disability Awareness Challenge! Explore and engage the lived experiences, perspectives, and concerns of our community members who happen to have disabilities.

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  • Visit: CSM's Disability Support Services web page
  • Read: "Universal Design for Learning: A Concise Introduction," by the ACCESS Project, Colorado State University
  • Act: Take a "disability walk" around your home and wherever else you go today. Imagine you have to get around in a wheelchair, or are blind, deaf, or have other physical differences. Where do you have difficulty getting where you need to go? Imagine you are neurodiverse, e.g., you have Asperger's Syndrome, autism, or Attention Deficit Disorder. Do you feel you would be supported at work, in school, or in other places you go today? 

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  • Watch: "Our Fight for Disability Rights and Why We're Not Done Yet" - TEDx Talk by Judith Heuman
  • Reflect: Have you ever experienced having less access than others to spaces or opportunities because of something different about your body or mind -- e.g., having to walk with crutches or having difficulty communicating a thought or feeling? Write a few sentences about what that was like and what might have made access easier for you.

Virtual Check-In: Thursday, October 29, 2:30-3:30 pm  

An informal meeting to talk with others about the Challenge: share new insights and new ideas!

Italian American Heritage Month was first celebrated in 1989, by a special proclamation of both Congress and President George H. W. Bush, to recognize the achievements and contributions of Italian immigrants and Italian Americans. More than 5 million Italians immigrated to the United States between 1820 and 2000. There are currently more than 26 million Americans of Italian descent in the US, making Italian-Americans the fifth largest ethnic group in the nation. 

Celebrate National Italian-American Heritage and Culture Month by joining CSM's 5-Day Italian-American Heritage Challenge! Engage the lived experiences, perspectives, and concerns of community members of Italian-American heritage.


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Virtual Check-In: Friday, October 30, 2:30-3:30 pm   
An informal meeting to talk with others about the Challenge: share new insights and new ideas!

Established in 1968, National Hispanic Heritage Month recognizes the contributions of those in the US whose ancestry can be traced to over 20 countries in Latin America, including Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean. In the US, approximately 60 million people (~18% of the US population) have ancestries connected to these countries. September 15 is the date on which several Latin American countries celebrate their independence from Spain: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence on September 16 and 18, respectively.

Observe National Hispanic Heritage Month by taking CSM's 5-Day Hispanic Heritage Challenge! A variety of sources explore the lived experiences, perspectives, and concerns of community members of Hispanic/Latin@/Latinx heritage. 

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  • Watch: "I Am Not My Status" - TEDx Talk by Ernesto Rocha
  • Reflect: What does liberation mean to you? How might liberation mean something different for others, and how might you support their liberation?

Virtual Check-In: Friday, October 16, 2:00-3:00 pm   
An informal meeting to talk with others about the Challenge: share new insights and new ideas!

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